Posts Tagged ‘David Axelrod’

GOP VP Candidate Paul Ryan Advocates “Medicare Premium Support”

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

Now that Representative Paul Ryan (R-WI) has been selected by former Governor Mitt Romney (R-MA) as his vice presidential running mate, the debate is focusing on the Wisconsin representative’s plan to reform Medicare.  Known as Medicare Premium Support, it “refers to a system under which Medicare enrollees would pick from a menu of competing plans with a fixed government payment to help defray premium costs.  Enrollees would be on the hook for any charges above the government contribution.  But they could save money by selecting a plan with a premium below the federal subsidy.”

Ryan says that under his plan, the government’s contribution toward premiums will equal the cost of the second least expensive plan in any market — or traditional Medicare — whichever costs less.  Ryan believes that his plan is politically feasible because it doesn’t begin until 2022 with the result that it retains traditional Medicare for Americans who were 55 and older in 2011 — meaning that baby boomers are exempt from the changes.  Democrats who oppose the plan contend that Ryan’s Medicare overhaul would subject seniors to the vagaries of the private market, leaving them with little protection against rising premiums and negligible benefits.

So what is the difference between the Democratic and Republican cuts to Medicare?  The ACA stresses government control and central planning. The law creates a panel of 15 unelected government officials, called the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) to direct changes that will shrink spending by cutting physician and hospital reimbursement.  The Wyden-Ryan plan preserves the ACA’s targets for future Medicare spending, but uses competitive bidding.  Seniors would have the same benefits that they do now, and would have the option of choosing from several government-approved private insurance plans.

The Republican budget targets Medicare growth of GDP plus 0.5 percent, just as the 2013 Obama budget does. The difference lies in the fact that the GOP budget repeals the ACA, while maintaining that law’s Medicare cuts.  The Democratic budget leaves the ACA in place.

Writing in the Washington Post, Ezra Klein puts the difference in a nutshell:  “The difference between the two campaigns is not in how much they cut Medicare, but in how they cut Medicare.”

In an exclusive interview with Modern Healthcare magazine, Ryan says that “This is an idea whose time has come.  And it’s a bipartisan idea.  What Representative Ron Wyden (D-OR) and I tried to do was to plant the seeds of a bipartisan consensus.  We knew we weren’t going to pass it because of the politics.  We did this together to get the consensus-building started.”  Ryan believes that the plan’s chances for approval will greatly improve in 2013 — especially if the Romney/Ryan team wins the November 6 presidential election.  “I’m actually pretty optimistic,” he said, noting that the United States should reform healthcare on its own terms and “fix this on our terms” instead of borrowing European ideas.  “We believe there are far superior ways to get back to a patient-centered healthcare system, the nucleus of which is the patient and doctor — and not the government,” Ryan said.  “We believe consumer-driven, market-based reforms do more to alter the cost curve of healthcare inflation.”

If Ryan’s plan is enacted into law, people 55 and younger would see a change from one in which everyone gets the same set of government-paid benefits to one in which the government gives all senior citizens a fixed amount of money.  They could use this to purchase private insurance or pay a portion of the cost of enrolling in traditional Medicare.  Ryan has not said how much the premium support payment would be.  But he would limit the annual growth rate to no more than one-half percent more than the economy’s overall growth rate, even though healthcare costs are rising at a significantly faster pace.  Ryan’s plan would also raise the Medicare eligibility age to 67 from 65 by 2034.

Not so fast,” Democrats warn as partisans from both parties accuse the other side of throwing senior citizens under the bus.  “Make no mistake about it — these Republicans don’t believe in Medicare,” Obama campaign senior adviser David Axelrod said.  “They want to turn it into a voucher program.  And slowly, all the burden is going to shift to seniors themselves.  And that is not an answer to entitlement reform.”

Republicans counter that $716 billion in cuts to Medicare are already a part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).  An online video created by the Republican National Committee features Ryan saying that Democrats “have refused to make difficult decision because they are more worried about their next election than they are about the next generation.”  According to Ryan, “We won’t duck the tough issues; we will lead.”

Uwe Reinhardt, a healthcare economist at Princeton University disagrees, saying that rather than motivating insurers to control their costs, the Ryan plan will not benefit seniors.  “You’re essentially shoving these guys out on a boat, saying, ‘We’ll give you a push, but if the waves are rough, you’re on your own,” he said.  “It would really worry me if I were a middle-class American.”

Handicapping the ACA’s Fate

Wednesday, June 13th, 2012

As the nation anticipates the Supreme Court decision on the future of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA),  pointed questioning by justices has supporters and opponents facing the possibility that the law could be declared unconstitutional.  That would eliminate — along with the contentious mandate that people purchase health insurance — popular provisions such as letting young adults stay on their parents’ plans until age 26, making prescription drugs more affordable for seniors, and requiring insurers to cover those with pre-existing medical conditions.

Even if the court keeps most of the law intact and strikes down the individual mandate, many healthcare advocates, insurers, and legislators believe that these consumer protections will be meaningless.  “There are a series of provisions of the law which have already been enacted which have proven to be fairly popular,’’ said Andrew Dreyfus, president and CEO of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts.  “The question nationally is will there be bipartisan consensus to maintain those provisions even if the Supreme Court overturns some aspects of the law or the whole law?’’

Congress has been disinclined to talk about contingency plans, or the possibility of compromise.  There is agreement  that nothing will be done before November’s presidential election.  “Repeal and replace is a good slogan, but what kind of replacement are we talking about?’’ asked Gail Wilensky, a healthcare economist who administered Medicare and Medicaid under George H.W. Bush.  “Is it a replacement that will substantially extend coverage for people who have been uninsured?  At the moment it’s a little hard to see that happening.’’

“It’s a standard rule of politics that people value losses more than hypothetical gains,’’ said John McDonough, director of Harvard University’s Center for Public Health Leadership and who helped the Senate write the ACA.  “If the court were to strike down significant parts of the law that are already in place, there could quite possibly be a potent public reaction against what is being taken away from people.’’

In an interview with Kaiser Health News, Jon Kingsdale, Executive Director of the Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector Authority, who is working to implement the ACA said “We’re working with about a dozen states, and they fall, I’d say, into three camps: One, working very, very hard with a real strong vision of what they want to set up, to implement by October 1, 2013 – which is less than 18 months away.  Others that are planning – they’re preparing.  They’re waiting to see, in fact, if it’s implemented after the Supreme Court decision, which is expected to be announced in June – and/or the election in November.  And then there are states, frankly, we are not working with that are pretty much waiting to see this go away.”

Kingsdale believes that the entire law will not be thrown out by the Supreme Court.  “I think their striking down the entire law is much less probable than striking down the mandate,” he said.  “I’ve begun to talk to people in insurance companies and states and vendor organizations about what happens if the entire law is struck down, and I am struck by the lack of anticipation of what that would mean.  People are aware that there are huge problems. There are many things that have been implemented already, in terms of insurance coverage and Medicare payment policies and accountable care organizations, the authorization of which would be undercut.”

David Axelrod, chief campaign strategist to President Barack Obama, is denying reports that the White House may revisit healthcare in his second term.  “Our hope and our expectation is that the Supreme Court will affirm the healthcare law,” Axelrod said.  “Now is not the time to speculate on that.  We believe that the law is constitutional.  The Affordable Care Act is also really important to the health and well-being of the American people,” Axelrod said. “It is already helping people all over this country, and has improved the position of people relative to their insurance companies, and the kind of policies they are getting and the return they are getting for the premiums they are paying.”

Speak Softly and Carry an Oversized Gavel

Thursday, March 25th, 2010

 The House of Representatives passes healthcare.  Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), Speaker of the House, presided over the often fractious but historic healthcare reform overhaul vote with the help of an oversized gavel borrowed from Representative John Dingell (D-MI), who chaired the passage of the Medicare bill 45 years ago.  “A treasure in the Dingell family that was used in the enactment of the Medicare law,” Pelosi said.  “I will use it this evening when we cast a very successful vote for this important legislation.  This has been a complete team effort, not only a team effort, a partnership with our leadership and every member of our caucus and we look forward to making this historic day known to the American people.”

The late Sunday evening passage of the healthcare reform bill by a thin 219 – 212 margin was described by President Barack Obama as “This is what change looks like.”  All 178 House Republicans and 34 Democrats voted against the legislation, which ultimately will cover 32,000,000 Americans who currently lack healthcare coverage.  Also on Sunday, the House passed a package of “fixes” that will resolve some of the conflicts between the House and Senate versions of the healthcare bill.  Senate Democrats plan to pass the fixes under budget reconciliation, which requires a simple majority vote.

The president, who plans to sign the bill, said “Tonight, after nearly 100 years of talk and frustration, after decades of trying, and a year of sustained effort and debate, the United States Congress finally declared that America’s workers and America’s families and America’s small businesses deserve the security of knowing that here, in this country, neither illness nor accident should endanger the dreams they’ve worked a lifetime to achieve.”

“This is the Civil Rights Act of the 21st century,” said Representative James E. Clyburn (D-SC), the third highest ranking Democrat in the House.