Posts Tagged ‘Hospital-acquired infectious diseases’

Burnout Affects 30 Percent of Nurses

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

With hospitals slashing costs to cope with growing financial pressures, nurses believe that the resulting insufficient staffing is detrimental to patients.  A team from the University of Pennsylvania has identified a key reason for this: Hospitals where relative fewer caregivers work typically provide inferior care.  If hospitals reduced their proportion of burned-out nurses to 10 percent from the prevailing 30 percent, they would prevent 4,160 cases a year of the two most-common hospital-acquired infections and save $41 million in Pennsylvania alone.  “It is costing hospitals more money not to spend money on nursing,” said Linda H. Aiken, one of the study’s authors and director of the Penn Nursing School’s Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research.

The researchers determined that the nurses studied averaged 5.7 patients on a typical shift, said Rutgers University professor Jeannie Cimiotti.  “Maybe they are staffed a little bit above what they should, but if they (hospitals) can provide an organizational climate that’s conducive to nursing, I think they’d be fine,” Cimiotti said. “That doesn’t mean you can overburden them because workload is one of those factors that does contribute to burnout.”

“Most burnout is related to high workload,” said Patricia Eakin, an ER nurse who is president of the Pennsylvania Association of Staff Nurses and Allied Professionals.  Patients nowadays need a whole lot of care. There’s a lot of equipment, a whole lot of fancy things. A lot of things that take a lot of time and a lot of attention.”

Historically, the number of nurses per patient was low following World War I.  At what would ultimately become Baylor University Medical Center, the hospital in 1919 accommodated 225 patients who were cared for by a nursing staff of 12 graduates and 100 students.  As recently as the 1980s, nurses often cared for eight or nine patients (Insert Nurse Together link here.)  The night shift could see a single nurse caring for as many as a dozen patients, often without a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) to assist.

The shift in the United States from Florence Nightingale’s concept of multi-bed wards (which often contained 30 or more beds and were typically staffed by one or two nurses) to private and semi-private rooms started in the years following World War II and was mostly complete by the 1970s.  Private hospital rooms at this time were primarily reserved for patients whose families could afford to pay extra to keep their relative out of a ward and hire a private duty nurse to provide one-on-one care.  According to Jean C. Whelan, PhD, RN, “Private-duty nursing was the employment of nurses by individual patients for the delivery of care.  Patients hired their own nurse, who cared for them either in their homes or in the hospital.  Patients paid the nurse for her services with cash, based on a predetermined fee.  The nurse, generally employed for the duration of an illness, cared for only one patient at a time.  In essence, the private-duty nurse delivered highly individualized care to paying patients for as long as a patient needed and could pay for the nurse’s services.”

According to a U.S. National Library of Medicine of the National Institutes of Health Study, thousands of nurses — the vast majority of them women — migrate each year in search of better pay and working conditions, career mobility, professional development, a better quality of life, personal safety, or sometimes just novelty and adventure.  The percentage of foreign-educated physicians working in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States is currently reported to be between 21 and 33 percent, while foreign-educated nurses represent five to 10 percent of these countries’ nurse workforce.”

In 1994, nine percent of total registered nurses were foreign-born RNs; by 2008 that percentage had risen to 16.3 percent, or about 400,000 RNs.  Of those, approximately 10 percent had immigrated to the U.S. during the previous five years. About one-third of growth in RNs between 2001 and 2008 was fueled by foreign-born RNs.  The news is not all positive, though.  According to Newsweek, “While pay has risen in some regions to attract more nurses, in recent years it has flattened at the national level.  That’s why up to 500,000 registered nurses are choosing not to practice their profession — fully one-fifth of the current RN workforce of 2.5 million.”

Bringing those badly needed nurses from overseas is not always easy, said William R. Moore of El Centro Regional Medical Center in California, who has been waiting two years for 20 nurses from the Philippines he recruited to obtain visas.  In the meantime, Moore can’t find talent in the area.  “We’re in the poorest and least literate county in California, right in the middle of the desert,” says Moore. “We’re not a destination for (American) nurses.”

As the role of registered nurses has evolved over the years to encompass increased responsibility, so too, have the educational requirements.  A two-year associate degree (AND) or a four years bachelor’s degree — typically a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) — are the two primary degrees required in the 21st century.  Many nurses opt to pursue their Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree, which requires a minimal commitment of two years to complete the course work.  Others go even further in their educations, studying for a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) or a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP).

Studying for a BSN degree — like all college educations – doesn’t come cheaply.  According to the Registered Nurse Education Requirements website, “Tuition and clinical fees together make up the total cost of nursing education while the tuition fee for a two-year nursing course in a community college is just $1,400, the clinical fees can are considerably higher at $4,000 plus per semester.  For a bachelors course the students end up paying almost $7,000 to $8,000 in clinical fees while the tuition is still lower at just $2,000 to $3,000 per semester.  Apart from this, students will also have to incur the cost of books, parking, basic living expenses and housing in case of out-of-town colleges. The cost of training at hospital affiliated nursing schools can be higher at $55,000 for resident student and over $100,000 for non-residents.”