Posts Tagged ‘Means test’

GOP Proposes Putting Seniors on Congressional Healthcare Plan

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012

In a highly controversial move, Republicans critical of Medicare have proposed opening up the Federal Employee Health Benefits Plan (FEHBP) to Medicare patients.  “We are going to offer a plan that would give all senior citizens in the country the same congressional healthcare plan that we have,” said Senator Rand Paul (R-KY).  “We are not willing to wait until after the next election to fix the entitlements.”

The National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association (NARFE) warned that the plan could shake the federal program, while asking seniors to pay more for healthcare.  “This is a kill-two-birds-with-one-stone kind of proposal that would both bring down Medicare as we know it and threaten the stability of the FEHBP,” Joseph A. Beaudoin, NARFE president, said.  Beaudoin said seniors should examine the proposal closely, because it throws open the doors of a stable healthcare program to millions of seniors currently enrolled in Medicare.  “Given the current environment of budget attacks on federal employees, retirees and Medicare, the federal workforce and all Americans should be wary of plans like the one proposed today,” he said.

Called the Congressional Health Care for Seniors Act (CHCSA), the plan’s supporters claim that it would save taxpayers $1 trillion in the first 10 years as well as provide enhanced healthcare benefits, choice, quality and outcomes by moving seniors into the FEHBP.

How would it work?  Federal employees can now choose from approximately 250 plans participating in FEHBP, including 20 nationwide plans.  The large selection provides access to better doctors, better quality healthcare, and the ability to pick plans that best suit the person’s individual needs.  The rationale also is that because Congress uses the plan, it must be the best in the country.  Additionally, the legislation would set up a “high risk pool” for the costliest patients within the FEHBP.  The federal government will directly reimburse healthcare plans for enrolling the most expensive five percent of patients, which keeps premiums low while allowing high-risk patients to get the same quality healthcare as every other enrollee – federal employees and seniors alike.  If the legislation is passed, seniors could enroll in FEHBP starting in 2014.

There is some bipartisan support for this proposal.  In 2004, Senator John Kerry (D-MA) proposed allowing uninsured people, not seniors, to enroll in FEHBP.  “Entitlements are broken,” said Paul.  “It’s not Republicans’ fault; it’s not Democrats fault.  I tell people, ‘It’s your grandparents’ fault for having too many kids and then your fault for not having enough kids.’  It’s a demographic problem.”

Paul said the plan “means-tests the benefits and gradually allows the age of eligibility to go up.”  Currently, Medicare eligibility age is 65; Paul’s plan would gradually increase it to 70 by 2034.  “There is means-testing in this — and the reason you have to do that is: we’re spending more on Medicare than is coming in.”  According to Senator Lindsey Graham, (R-SC), “What I would tell the person near retirement is don’t fear change, embrace it, because you’ll have more doctors available to treat you and your family.  “Think about not just what happens to you…think about where we’ll be as a nation if something doesn’t change pretty quickly with these big programs.”

Virtually everyone in Washington agrees that the federal government must control its deficits and rising debt by finding a way to reduce entitlement spending.  President Bill Clinton’s former budget director, Leon Panetta, now defense secretary, who reproached the Senate Budget Committee: “You can’t meet the challenge that you’re facing in this country” by only cutting discretionary spending, which is less than a third of all spending.  “If you’re not dealing with the two-thirds that is entitlement spending, if you’re not dealing with revenues, and you keep going back to the same place, frankly you’re not going to make it, and you’re going to hurt this country’s security.”

Paul acknowledges that adding seniors to the federal program would drive costs up for its current 8.5 million enrollees by approximately 24 percent.  “Federal employees are the one group of people who may have a legitimate argument with the Congressional Health Care Plan for Seniors,” according to Paul’s synopsis.  “Asking them to share their healthcare with the elderly will cause their premiums to increase.”  Not surprisingly, as soon as the legislation was announced, the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association expressed concerns that the bill would destabilize the federal workers’ program.

Beaudoin notes that “As for the senators’ notion that America’s seniors should be in the same healthcare system as America’s elected officials, they seem to have forgotten that starting in 2014, members of Congress will no longer be covered by the FEHBP but will be in state-based healthcare exchanges.”

10 Percent of America’s Veterans Have No Healthcare Coverage

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012

Ten percent of the nation’s 12.5 million non-elderly veterans do not have health insurance coverage or use Veterans Administration (VA) health care according to the 2010 American Community Survey (ACS).  The Urban Institute report, which was released by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is the first to provide estimates of a lack of insurance among veterans and their families both nationally and at the state level, and to assess the potential for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) to reduce these rates.  Veterans are less likely be uninsured than the overall population.  Uninsured veterans and their families report significantly less access to healthcare than their counterparts with insurance coverage.  Forty-one percent of veterans who lack healthcare coverage have untreated medical needs, while nearly 34 percent have put off getting care because of the expense.

The ACA’s coverage provisions have the potential to increase coverage among the U.S. population, including uninsured veterans.  An estimated 50 percent of veterans who currently do not have insurance would qualify for expanded Medicaid coverage; another 40 percent have the potential to receive subsidized coverage through health insurance exchanges if they lack access to affordable employer coverage.  Not surprisingly states that have made minimal progress in setting up health insurance exchanges have the most uninsured veterans — nearly 40 percent.  Success in bringing coverage to uninsured veterans will depend primarily on aggressive ACA implementation and enrollment efforts.

The Veterans Administration (VA) –  with more than 1,400 hospitals nationally and nearly 15,000 physicians – covers the majority of veterans, although not all: Eligibility is determined by income, injuries sustained in combat and length of service.  Because of the eligibility requirements, 1.3 million veterans and 0.9 million family members have no healthcare coverage.

Uninsured veterans typically are younger than those with coverage and less likely to have been injured in combat.  Uninsured veterans tend to have higher unemployment rates, less income and usually are not married — all of which reduce the odds of having private coverage.  “Their lower likelihood of being full-time workers and being married likely contribute to their lack of coverage, as these attributes are characterized by lower access to employer-sponsored health insurance,” according to the Urban Institute study.

Writing for the Non-Profit Quarterly, Rick Cohen notes that “Among the states with the worst rates of uninsured veterans, Louisiana, Oregon, and Idaho all top 14 percent, and Montana comes in at a woeful 17.3 percent.  This past weekend, the streets of Washington, D.C. were occupied by participants in the Rolling Thunder demonstration, the annual Memorial Day gathering of veterans (and non-veterans) on motorcycles focused on calling the nation’s attention to the POW/MIA issue.  The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation report would suggest that, in the U.S., there is an abundance of veterans and their families who are being treated as if MIA when it comes to health insurance.”

According to Dr. Jonathan D. Walker, assistant clinical professor at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Fort Wayne,  “A Harvard study estimated that more than 2,200 veterans died in 2008 due to lack of insurance.  You may have thought that veterans can automatically be treated at a veterans’ hospital, but this is not the case.  Uninsured veterans face a “means test” based on their income.  The test determines their priority level for care and how much they have to pay.  And if the system doesn’t have enough money, it can stop enrolling veterans if they fail the means test – as happened from 2003 to 2009.  But even if the VA were able to fully cover every veteran, it would still leave a lot of veterans without care because they do not live near a VA hospital.  And even if they live near a hospital, they still may need to drive far away to get services that aren’t available locally.  There are laws that make it illegal for an insurance company to force patients to drive an excessive distance to stay in their network, yet we think nothing of making veterans drive long distances simply to get the care to which they are entitled.”