Posts Tagged ‘Sen. Orrin Hatch’

What Would Repeal Look Like?

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has issued a report that the House Republicans’ bill to repeal President Obama’s health care reform legislation would increase the deficit by roughly $230 billion through 2021.   According to the CBO statement, “The March health care legislation would have a net cost of about $780 billion over the 2012-2019 period. Repealing that legislation would eliminate such costs. But [the health care legislation] also included a number of provisions to reduce federal outlays (primarily for Medicare) and to increase federal revenues (mostly by increasing the Hospital Insurance payroll tax and imposing fees on certain manufacturers and insurers); in March, CBO and JCT estimated that those provisions unrelated to insurance coverage would, on balance, reduce direct spending by about $500 billion and increase revenues by about $410 billion over the 2012-2019 period. If that legislation was repealed, such reductions in spending and increases in revenues would not occur. Thus, H.R. 2 would, on net, increase federal deficits over that period.”

Undeterred, Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), ranking member on the Finance Committee, said if Republicans gain control of the chamber next year, their efforts to replace the healthcare overhaul will focus on cost control, instead of coverage expansions. Hatch was the author (along with Ted Kennedy) of SCHIP, the largest expansion of taxpayer-funded health insurance coverage for children in the U.S. since Medicaid began in the 1960s. Hatch is in position to lead the committee with primary jurisdiction over federal health policy if Republicans retake the Senate, which Republicans would do if they net only four Democratic-held seats.

As evidence of ObamaCare’s inability to reduce overall healthcare costs, Hatch cited the 9.5% increase in the cost of an average family health plan to $15,073 last year over its cost when the law was enacted.

The first cost-control efforts he would undertake would come in Medicare and Medicaid, he said. Those steps include increasing physician pay and removing “government-dictated prices” in Medicare that increases costs for the privately insured when providers pass along the cost of caring for Medicare and Medicaid patients.