Is the GOP Alone In Wanting to Repeal Healthcare Reform?

Even though Republicans will control the House of Representatives and have a larger presence in the Senate come January, they still are likely to hit some formidable roadblocks in their attempt to repeal the Affordable Care and Patient Protection Act. Those roadblocks are such lobbying giants as the American Medical Association (AMA), the American Hospital Association (AHA) and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PRMA).  The groups are on board with the new healthcare reform law because they will gain an estimated 30 million (or more) new paying customers in the next few years.  The reform law is expected to increase payments to physicians and hospitals who have felt squeezed in recent years.  Additionally, analysts believe the new law is a major force for job creation in the healthcare sector.

“These guys were onboard for a reason,” said David Dranove, a professor of health enterprise management at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management.  “Very few employers will drop private health insurance, and you will expand private insurance to 15 million people.  If this legislation stands, we are not likely to see new reforms for a generation.”

Primary-care physicians, who are likely to benefit significantly from the healthcare reform law, will see their reimbursements from government insurance programs rise – although many believe the reform law is only the beginning.  According to Dr. Cecil Wilson, AMA president, “While the 111th Congress made important improvements to our nation’s healthcare system, more work needs to be done.”  Hospitals – which have been hard hit by patients unable to pay their medical bills because of unemployment – will be in better financial shape once more Americans get health insurance subsidies in 2014.

Pharmaceutical companies, which were among reform’s earliest supporters, oppose repeal, even though analysts say it will cost them $100 billion in government rebates.  The upside is that the industry will obtain new customers who were previously uninsured and unable to afford the latest brand-name medications.  Even the much-maligned insurance companies – who will have more than 15 million new customers – oppose repeal.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply