Mitt Romney Says “No” to Medicare on His 65th Birthday

Even though he just celebrated his 65th birthday, GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney isn’t signing up for Medicare or Social Security.  According to an aide, Romney plans to keep his private health insurance plan although there is no word on whether he accessed that plan through a former employer or bought it on the individual market.  Ironically, if elected, Romney wants to offer senior citizens the choice of enrolling in the traditional program or purchasing private insurance with some financial help from the government.

Romney’s decision puts him in a tiny minority. The vast majority of seniors participate in Medicare.  Nearly all seniors are automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A, which covers hospital care, although they can opt not to use it.  Another 95 percent enroll in Medicare Part B, which covers physician services, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

“It was personally meaningful in me to be enrolling in the program I ran.  It made me feel one step closer to the beneficiaries,” Dr. Donald Berwick, who left his post at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) at the end of 2011, said.  “It validated what I had thought — which was that it was remarkably easy [to sign up].  Any president, at any age, should be committed to these important programs,” Berwick said.

By contrast, two of Romney’s competitors — Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul — are already 65, the age at which most Americans become eligible to enroll in Medicare’s coverage of hospital treatment, physician visits and other medical care, including prescription drugs.  Gingrich has a Medicare Advantage plan, administered by Blue Cross Blue Shield, according to his campaign.  Medicare Advantage plans are run by private insurance companies, who receive a fixed monthly payment from the federal government.  Gingrich frequently plugs Medicare Advantage and wants to expand the proportion of seniors who enroll in it from the current 25 percent.  Congressman Paul has a federal government-sponsored Blue Cross Blue Shield employee health insurance plan.  He has said that he would not change any aspect of Medicare for current beneficiaries but would let younger people opt out of the program and use medical savings accounts or other ways to pay their own healthcare costs.

According to NPR’s Julie Rovner, “Romney is clearly making a political point.  Wealthy people like him ought to pay more for their Medicare benefits (if they get them at all) and that perhaps 65 is a little young to qualify, too.  ‘Wealthier seniors will receive less support,’ under the changes Romney has proposed for Medicare, according to his website. http://www.mittromney.com/issues/medicare At the same time, he is proposing to ‘gradually raise the retirement age to reflect increases in longevity.’  But could his political point cost him more down the road if he changes his mind?  Maybe.  Medicare charges penalties for those who wait to sign up.  It’s the program’s way of ensuring that people don’t wait until they get sick to enroll.”

Beneficiaries currently have a seven-month window to sign up for Medicare: three months before their birth month, the month of their birthday, and three months after their birthday.  That means that Romney has through June to enroll if he changes his mind.  The majority of adults use the Social Security Administration website to enroll for their benefits, while others go to local district offices.

Writing for the Huffington Post, Ethan Rome, Executive Director of Health Care for America Now, says that “I’m not sure what Romney’s trying to prove, but what his action says is clear: I’m not like the Americans who enroll in Medicare.  I’m special.  I’m rich.  I’m better than you.  Ask yourself: If Romney doesn’t need or want Medicare for himself, will he protect it for the rest of us who do?  Of course not.  Instead, he’ll continue to support the Republican plan to eliminate Medicare as we know it.  He’ll work to turn Medicare into a voucher program that will saddle seniors with thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket health care costs.  Because, after all, what senior can’t afford to spend an extra $6,400 a year on doctors and hospitals?  Before Medicare, seniors were left at the mercy of the private market and therefore virtually uninsurable.  Without insurance, even brief hospital stays could impoverish them.  The result was that the elderly went without the care they needed — unless their families were rich.  Most seniors were one illness away from bankruptcy.”

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