Nine Million Americans Lost Healthcare Coverage During the Recession

The financial crisis not only robbed nine million Americans of their jobs – but also their healthcare insurance. According to a new study by The Commonwealth Fund, only 25 percent of Americans who lost employer-sponsored healthcare coverage succeeded at finding another source.  As a result, an estimated 52 million Americans did not have healthcare coverage in 2010.  Even though the federal government provides a subsidy, just 14 percent of people who lost their jobs continued their coverage through COBRA.

According to The Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey of 2010, “Using data from The Commonwealth Biennial Health Insurance Survey of 2010 and prior years, this report examines the effect of the recession on the health insurance coverage of adults between the ages of 19 and 64 and the implications for both their finances and their access to healthcare.  The survey of 3,033 adults, conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from July 2010 to November 2010, finds that in the last two years a majority of men and women who lost a job that had health benefits became uninsured.  Adults who sought coverage on the individual insurance market over the past three years struggled to find plans they could afford and many were charged higher premiums, had a health condition excluded from their coverage, or were denied coverage altogether because of a pre-existing condition.  Meanwhile, Americans with health insurance had higher deductibles and consequently greater exposure to medical costs.  And millions were struggling to pay medical bills, facing cost-related barriers to getting the care they need, or skipping or delaying needed care, including prescription medications, because of the cost.”

Just 50 percent of adults aged 64 or less are current with preventive care.  Fully 49 million employed Americans spent 10 percent or more of their yearly income on out-of-pocket costs and insurance premiums, a sharp increase from the 31 million reported in 2001.  Once the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) goes into full effect in 2014, the situation is likely to improve dramatically.  “These reforms have enormous potential to begin solving the problems identified in this report,” said Sara Collins, vice president of The Commonwealth Fund, a private foundation that promotes a high performing healthcare system that achieves better access, improved quality, and greater efficiency, particularly for society’s most vulnerable, including low-income people, the uninsured, minority Americans, children, and the elderly.

“The report tells the story of the continuing deterioration of healthcare accessibility, efficiency, safety and affordability over the past decade,” said The Commonwealth Fund president Karen Davis. “All this despite the fact that the United States spends more than any other country on healthcare.  Most recently it has failed the millions of Americans who lost their jobs during the recession and lost health benefits as well, leaving them with no place to turn for affordable healthcare coverage.  The silver lining is that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has already begun to bring relief to families,” Davis said.  “Once the new law is fully implemented, we can be confident that no future recession will have the power to strip so many Americans of their health security.”

Of those people who attempted to buy an individual plan during the study’s timeframe — 19 million individuals – or 71 percent found it difficult or impossible to locate a plan they could afford and met their needs, were denied coverage or charged extra because of a pre-existing medical condition.  Adults with family incomes of less than $22,050 for a family of four were hardest hit with 54 percent having no healthcare insurance.  An additional 41 percent of families with incomes of between $22,050 and $44,100 had no coverage.  Of higher-income families, just 13 percent lacked healthcare coverage in 2010.

Conservative groups such as the Heritage Foundation are critical of the healthcare reform law.  The Washington, D.C.-based think tank wants changes made to the healthcare system to make it less reliant on government and to have individuals “own and control their own healthcare policies.”  Additionally, Heritage believes that the healthcare law will increase government spending.  “Of course there’s some people who will benefit from the law, but just focusing on individuals with benefits is misleading,” said Brian Blase, a policy analyst in health studies.  “You have to look at the law in its totality.”

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