Posts Tagged ‘General practitioners’

Healthcare Employment on a Strong Growth Trajectory

Monday, April 16th, 2012

Healthcare employment will continue to grow much faster than employment in general, with the number of jobs in home care and other ambulatory settings expected to grow by more than 40 percent by 2020, according to a new study from the Center for Health Workforce Studies (CHWS) at the State University of New York at Albany.

Recent statistics from the Department of Labor focus on an expected hiring shift away from hospitals, as the system emphasizes preventive care and fewer admissions, said Jean Moore, CHWS director.  “For a long time, acute-care services tended to trump everything else, and that seems to be changing,” Moore said.  “There’s a growing awareness that it’s penny-wise and pound-foolish not to pay attention to preventive and primary care.”

Hospitals also are expected to keep hiring — nearly one million between now and 2020 — for a growth rate of 17 percent – as baby boomers age and need more inpatient care.

Physicians’ offices and other healthcare professionals are projected to hire 1.4 million people by 2020, a 36 percent increase.  The number of home health care jobs will soar by 872,000 – that’s an 81 percent growth rate.  The total number of ambulatory-care jobs will grow by 2.7 million by 2020, or 44 percent.

According to Kaiser Health News, healthcare is projected to be a growth industry, even if the Supreme Court strikes down the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).  “One of the things I wasn’t expecting was how much growth there was even during the recession,” Moore said.  “I would have expected some tempering of the growth.”

Although total U.S. employment declined by two percent between 2000 and 2010, healthcare employment rose 25 percent — demonstrating the sector’s expanding share of the economy.  By 2020, nearly one of every nine American jobs will be in healthcare.  When you consider that four million new health jobs will be created and people retiring from existing ones, more than seven million new workers will be needed.  That includes more than one million nurses.

According to the report, administrative healthcare jobs were cut during the economic slump from 2008 to 2010, a time when providers added nursing and other clinical positions.  Recent reports suggest that hospitals are hiring additional administrative staff to keep up with the increased regulation required by the ACA.  “They may be rehiring the people they had to let go when times were tight,” Moore said.

Healthcare employment totaled 14.19 million in October of 2011, an increase from the 13.88 million a year earlier, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.  Hospital jobs increased by 84,000 during the same time period.  Ambulatory services — physician offices, outpatient clinics and home health agencies added more than 173,000 positions.

Demand is strongest for general practitioners, nurse practitioners and physician assistants at private practices, community clinics, hospitals and long-term care facilities.  Demand also is high for physical therapists.  Some analysts predict that the shortage of physical therapists will increase as healthcare reform goes into effect.  Fewer uninsured Americans translates to a greater demand for physical therapy.  In response, medical schools are expanding and developing physical therapy training programs.

If anything, the physical therapist shortage will worsen, because in 2000, 15.6 percent were between the ages 50 and 64; 10 years later, 32 percent were in that age bracket, according to a report from the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA).  Unemployment among physical therapists remains remarkably low: In 2010, only 0.4 percent — one in 250 — of physical therapists were jobless.  “Nobody knows how accountable-care organizations and medical homes will shake out, but healthcare reform in general will decrease the number of uninsured, which will increase demand for physical therapists,” said Marc Goldstein, senior director of research for the APTA.  “Physical therapy programs are being developed or expanded, so the current level of 6,000 graduates annually should creep up.”

A survey by Sullivan, Cotter and Associates, Inc., a nationally-recognized compensation and human resource management consulting firm, over the last year, nearly 75 percent of respondents reported they increased their physician staffing levels; adding an average of 12 specialists and nine primary-care physicians to their staffs.  Another 75 percent said they plan to increase their physician staffs and mid-level providers over the next year.  “These data are consistent with the labor market shift in physician employment that has been occurring over the past few years,” said Kim Mobley, practice leader for physician compensation.  “We expect this trend to continue for some time.  This shift in the labor market has resulted in what has become a highly competitive market for physicians as organizations and physicians align to provide services in a high quality, more efficient manner.”

Medical School Enrollment on the Rise

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

More young Americans are deciding to become physicians during a tough jobs market, even though they tend not to choose the high-demand primary care.  American medical schools were pleased when they received a record number of applications in 2011.  Applicants increased by 1,178, or 2.8 percent, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).  Fully 43,919 men and women applied to U.S. medical schools this year, including 32,654 first-time applicants, according to the Washington, D.C.-based AAMC.  First-year enrollment increased by three percent to 19,230, a rise of 18,665 when compared with 2010.

A vital highlight is the larger number of African-American applicants, following a 0.2 percent decline in 2010.  Those numbers grew by 4.7 percent to 3,640 in 2011, while enrollees rose by 1.9 percent to 1,375.  The number of Hispanic/Latino applicants also grew by 5.7 percent to 3,459, with enrollment rising by 6.1 percent to 1,633.  Asians comprised 22.7 percent of the total applicant pool; applicants who identified themselves as white made up 62.3 percent of the total.

Meanwhile, first-time female applicants grew 3.3 percent to 15,953, while female enrollment increased by 3.2 percent to 9,037.  The number of first-time male applicants increased by 1.9 percent for a total of 16,698 applications with 10,193 enrollees, a 2.9 percent increase when compared with 2010.  AAMC said medical schools attract well-qualified applicants, noting their academic profiles included an average grade-point average of 3.5 and an MCAT score of 29.

“We are very pleased that medicine continues to be an attractive career choice at a time when our healthcare system faces many challenges, including a growing need for doctors coupled with a serious physician shortage in the near future,” said Darrell G. Kirch, M.D., AAMC president and CEO.  “At the same time the number of applicants is on the rise, we also are encouraged that the pool of medical school applicants and enrollees continues to be more diverse.  This diversity will be important as these new doctors go out into communities across the country to meet the health care needs of all Americans.

“U.S. medical schools have been responding to the nation’s health challenges by finding ways not only to select the right individuals for medicine, but also to educate and train more doctors for the future.  However, to increase the nation’s supply of physicians, the number of residency training positions at teaching hospitals must also increase to accommodate the growth in the number of students in U.S. medical schools.  We are very concerned that proposals to decrease federal support of graduate medical education will exacerbate the physician shortage, which is expected to reach 90,000 by 2020,” Kirch said.

Wait a minute!  The Council on Physician and Nurse Supply disagrees, noting that the U.S. will be short 200,000 physicians by 2020. “According to recent data, physician demand seems to be a real crisis,” said Onyx M.D. CEO and Chairman Robert Moghim, M.D.  “Not only is the overall physician shortage a major problem but certain specialties will be hit harder than others, especially primary-care specialists.”

In fact, the AMA announced that the number of primary-care physicians (PCPs) could decrease by 35,000 to 40,000 by 2025.  Apparently PCPs are becoming increasingly frustrated in many areas of their practice.  “Dealing with third-party payers, governmental red tape, slowness in receiving reimbursement and increased time spent with non-clinical paperwork seems to be driving this discontent,” said Monty McKentry, VP of Client Services & Recruitment at Onyx M.D.  He notes that, “These factors may be the cause of the newly reported data from the Journal of the American Medical Association that only two percent of current medical students intend to go into primary care.”

To make this situation even worse, there is a growing concern that one new physician entering the work force may not equal the productivity of a retiring physician.  This can be attributed to a cultural shift to a better work-life balance, shorter working hours and increased demand for more part-time work.  With the anticipated shortage in primary-care physicians, demand will increase for short-term coverage or locum tenens (a place-holder).  “We anticipate a wide variety of new opportunities as primary care physicians look for other alternatives such as locum tenens, Moghim said.”

Finally, Kirch highlighted programs that provide scholarships and loan forgiveness in exchange for working as general practitioners in the nation’s underserved areas.  According to Kirch, more funding is needed for these programs, and payments to primary-care physicians for services should be increased.