Posts Tagged ‘Governor Haley Barbour’

Battle About Medicaid Block Grants Brewing in Congress

Wednesday, May 11th, 2011

Mississippi Governor – and possible presidential hopeful — Haley Barbour and other Republican governors recently demanded that Medicaid, the state-federal health program that covers 50 million poor and disabled, be transformed into block grants.  House Republicans have vowed to tackle expensive programs like Medicaid to cut federal spending.  Any attempt to turn Medicaid into block grants – federal lump-sum payments to states – raises many questions.  Democrats argue that a move of this type could result in loss of healthcare coverage for millions who are poor, sick and old.

Representative Fred Upton (R-MI), chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Health Subcommittee said to expect House bills on the Medicaid program’s maintenance-of-effort requirement and block grant funding to states.  Because Medicaid is an entitlement program, all Americans who are eligible are guaranteed coverage.  The federal government, which foots the bill for approximately 60 percent of Medicaid’s cost, is committed to helping the  states cover costs; in return, it requires them to cover certain groups of people and provide specific benefits.  For example, children, pregnant women who meet explicit income criteria and parents with dependent children must be given coverage.

“The governors have requested flexibility in the way they serve Medicaid patients,” Representative Joseph Pitts (R-PA), the Health Subcommittee’s chairman said.  “They maintain they can provide the service better and cheaper, so we’re looking to give them that flexibility and change this maintenance-of-effort provision.  I won’t be specific on the block grants, but we’re having discussions with governors.”  Pitts’ comments followed a Health Subcommittee hearing in which HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius answered extensive questions about the Obama administration’s fiscal 2012 budget and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Why are the block grants important?  When the new healthcare law goes into full effect in 2014, approximately 16 million additional people will become eligible for Medicaid.  The debate, which cuts to the heart of the social contract between the government and its citizens, has implications for the other large entitlement programs — Social Security and Medicare.  In 2010, the federal government spent $1.5 trillion on those programs, or approximately 43 percent of the federal budget, according to the Congressional Budget Office.  Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) said House Republicans’ upcoming budget proposal would cut Social Security and Medicare, despite the political risk of taking on such popular programs.  Democrats are skeptical.  Changing Medicaid into a block grant means “you have no guarantee that people who are now covered will continue to be covered, or whether (the states) will simply cut back on their Medicaid program,” said Representative Henry Waxman, (D-CA), who is a primary defender of the program.

Republicans Vow to Take on Healthcare Entitlement Programs

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

With the power shift in the House of Representatives, Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security are being targeted in proposed budget cuts designed to bring down the deficit. “It will likely be the first time you see a House have a prescription for Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid,” House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) said at the Federation of American Hospitals’ annual public policy conference and business exposition in Washington.

Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour, a Republican, said that members of Mississippi’s Medicaid program saw its enrollment drop approximately 23 percent to 580,000 beneficiaries from 750,000 after the state started requiring beneficiaries to establish their eligibility in person.  Barbour began this practice in his first year as governor in 2004.  Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT), the ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, slammed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), noting that its expansion of Medicaid will “bankrupt” the states, which already have strained budgets.  Hatch also cited Congressional Budget Office figures that say the ACA’s Medicaid expansion will cost taxpayers $435 billion over the next decade.

President Barack Obama said his proposed 2012 budget was a “down payment,” on cutting the federal budget deficit, and said that more work is needed to address “long term challenges”. Cantor said that on “individual items” there were “probably some areas of agreement” between the President and Republicans.  “But we can’t keep taking the savings and going to spend it,” he said.  “The object here is to cut.”  According to Cantor, the President’s plan “just misses the mark of living up to the expectations” Obama laid out in his State of the Union speech in January.  Asked if Cantor expected adjustments to Social Security and Medicare, Cantor said he was “hopeful that we can get some cooperation from [Senate Majority Leader] Harry Reid [D-NV] and the President, because these are programs that touch the lives of every American and we don’t want, nor can we, make these changes by ourselves.”

Writing on the Huffington Post, Richard Eskow took an alarmist tone, saying that “entitlement reform” is a euphemism for allowing the elderly to die if they become ill. “’The President’s budget punts on entitlement reform,’ reads a statement by House Republicans.  ‘Our budget will lead where the President has failed, and it will include real entitlement reforms.’  ‘You have to do entitlement reforms if you are serious about this budget,’ according to Representative Paul Ryan (R-WI).”  Eskow counters “Reality check: Nobody’s proposing ‘entitlement reform.’ That term is a cloaking device for some very ugly intentions.  It’s a meaningless manufactured phrase cooked up by some highly-paid consultant, and it diminishes the sum total of human understanding every time it’s used.  The phrase is a euphemism for deep cuts to programs that are vital and even life-saving for millions of elderly and poor people, but it’s politically unpalatable to say that.  So it became necessary to come up with yet another cognition-killing term designed to numb us from the human toll of our political actions.  ‘Entitlement reform’ is the new ‘collateral damage.’”

The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein is more diplomatic in his assessment of the possibility of entitlement reform. “We’ll see.  I wouldn’t be surprised if Obama has his name on a broader deficit-reduction bill at this time next year.  If he takes the deficit away from Republicans before 2012, his reelection campaign becomes considerably easier.  And on a less cynical level, his administration is stocked with deficit hawks — the same folks who actually balanced the budget under Bill Clinton.  And similarly, Republicans want to deliver on the deficit-reduction promises they’ve made to their base.  In theory, everyone’s incentives and ideologies are pointing in the same direction.  That’s a good sign for progress.”