Posts Tagged ‘Representative John Boehner’

Capitol Hill Kabuki

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011

Five Senators want to take the House-passed Medicare plan off the table in bipartisan deficit reduction talks, claiming that the plan effectively dismantles the program.  According to the Senators, the Medicare plan, which passed as part of a budget proposal in April, would jeopardize senior citizens’ current benefits and double out-of-pocket costs.  The five are Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD); Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH); Senator Bill Nelson, (D-FL); Senator Claire McCaskill, (D-MO); and Senator Jon Tester, (D-MT).

In a letter to Vice President Joe Biden, the senators wrote:  “We are aware the administration has rejected this proposal since its passage by the House, and we applaud your efforts to educate the American people about its serious implications.  We encourage you to remain unwavering in opposition to this scheme.  For the good of the nation’s seniors, it must remain off the table.”

According to the letter,“This proposal would never pass Congress on its own, and it does not belong in a larger deal either.  It would be devastating for America’s seniors, who would see their out-of-pocket costs for healthcare double and the benefits they currently enjoy jeopardized.  Under this risky proposal, insurance company bureaucrats would decide what seniors get.”  Biden is leading talks to raise the debt ceiling and negotiating with lawmakers regarding ways to reduce the deficit as a trade-off to raise the debt ceiling.

The deficit and debt limit – whose ceiling the nation is rapidly approaching – are part of the conversation on Capitol Hill.  “I’m willing.  I’m ready. It is time to have the conversation” about deficit cuts and the debt limit, said House Speaker John Boehner

(R-OH), urging President Barack Obama to involve himself personally.  “It is time to play large ball, not small ball.”  House Democratic leader Representative Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) said, “I could never support any arrangement that reduced benefits for Medicare.  Absolutely not,” she said,” emphasizing a position she and other Democrats had laid out at their own meeting with the president.   Given Medicare’s size — nearly $500 billion a year — any deal on cutting future deficits is likely to include savings from the program, and may include the benefit cuts that most Democrats oppose.

The Obama administration has come out against the Medicare reforms in the House plan –  authored by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI).  The Senators insist that this is a non starter, and stressed that they must not be a point of negotiation during the ongoing debt ceiling talks.  Despite the Democrats’ opposition, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) insists that the Medicare reform plan will be “on the table” in negotiations.  “We are going to discuss what ought to be done,” McConnell said.  “I can assure you that to get my vote to raise the debt ceiling, for whatever that is worth…Medicare will be a part of it.”

Some Republicans are backing away from Ryan’s proposal.  For example, presidential candidate Newt Gingrich had egg on his face after suggesting that the plan is “radical… right-wing social engineering,” Gingrich’s explanations proved too little, too late for many conservatives, who continue to hammer the former House speaker for his gaffe.

In an op-ed piece for the San Francisco Sentinel,  Chrystia Freeland writes that “The political theater in the United States this week has been all about the ‘debt ceiling’:  Congress voting not to increase it; President Barack Obama and the House Republicans are meeting to discuss it; and the Treasury warning that failure to raise it will bring economic apocalypse for the United States and the world.  Elites like to accuse ordinary Americans of a lack of political sophistication, but everyone from Main Street to Wall Street is savvy enough to understand that so far, the fighting over the ceiling is pure Kabuki.  As with the budget deal earlier this year, the real negotiating is unlikely to happen until the very last minute.  But everyone also understands that this summer game of brinkmanship matters because it is a proxy war being fought over a very real problem:  the growing national debt and deficit.  At just under 60 percent of gross domestic product, the U.S. national debt is lower than that of France, Germany and Britain.  And the rest of the world still seems delighted to lend the United States money on historically generous terms.”

Medicare Likely Safe From GOP Budget Cutters

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

America’s senior citizens can breathe a sigh of relief.  Even as the majority Republicans in the House of Representatives wield a surgeon’s scalpel to slash spending from the federal budget, they are unlikely to succeed at making significant changes to the extremely popular Medicare program. The Democratic-controlled Senate rejected serious cuts in the proposed legislation, which also included an attempt to block implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.  Congressional Democrats and the Obama Administration pointed out that the Republican budget measure’s block on implementation funding would endanger short-term funding for Medicare.

The legislation would create “significant disruptions in services” to Medicare recipients, Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius wrote to Senator Max Baucus (D-MT).  The payment delays, Sebelius wrote, would halt the need to undertake a lengthy process to issue new regulations governing Medicare Advantage payment rates since the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) put in place its own set of payment rate rules.  The Congressional Budget Office’s (CBO) analysis questioned that claim because it believes that the Republican bill will reduce spending by $1.6 billion through the rest of 2011.  Democrats maintain that the CBO’s review of Medicare spending is a separate issue from HHS’s lawful authority to fund the program.

Despite the Senate Democrats’ united front, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI) is “ready to take on health programs” as legislators on both sides of the aisle struggle with long-term spending concerns.  Lawmakers continue talks regarding the current year spending measure still under consideration.  A new continuing resolution that would fund government operations until April 8 has emerged.  Though it includes deeper spending cuts, it is free of controversial riders such as language to restrict ACA implementation funds.  Meanwhile, the CBO issued a report that legislation designed to further the defunding goal would add $5.7 billion to the deficit.

Democratic leaders insisted that some form of compromise by the House GOP members is now needed. “We’re looking for some give on the Republican side,” said Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY).  Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH), he said, “needs something to bring his freshmen into the real world.”  Boehner, referencing the Democrats and the White House, said “I hope the talks are going to continue, but we are not going to get very far if they don’t get serious about doing what the American people expect of us.  “This is not going to be easy.  Our goal, as I’ve said many times, is to cut spending and keep the government open.”

Battle About Medicaid Block Grants Brewing in Congress

Wednesday, May 11th, 2011

Mississippi Governor – and possible presidential hopeful — Haley Barbour and other Republican governors recently demanded that Medicaid, the state-federal health program that covers 50 million poor and disabled, be transformed into block grants.  House Republicans have vowed to tackle expensive programs like Medicaid to cut federal spending.  Any attempt to turn Medicaid into block grants – federal lump-sum payments to states – raises many questions.  Democrats argue that a move of this type could result in loss of healthcare coverage for millions who are poor, sick and old.

Representative Fred Upton (R-MI), chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Health Subcommittee said to expect House bills on the Medicaid program’s maintenance-of-effort requirement and block grant funding to states.  Because Medicaid is an entitlement program, all Americans who are eligible are guaranteed coverage.  The federal government, which foots the bill for approximately 60 percent of Medicaid’s cost, is committed to helping the  states cover costs; in return, it requires them to cover certain groups of people and provide specific benefits.  For example, children, pregnant women who meet explicit income criteria and parents with dependent children must be given coverage.

“The governors have requested flexibility in the way they serve Medicaid patients,” Representative Joseph Pitts (R-PA), the Health Subcommittee’s chairman said.  “They maintain they can provide the service better and cheaper, so we’re looking to give them that flexibility and change this maintenance-of-effort provision.  I won’t be specific on the block grants, but we’re having discussions with governors.”  Pitts’ comments followed a Health Subcommittee hearing in which HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius answered extensive questions about the Obama administration’s fiscal 2012 budget and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Why are the block grants important?  When the new healthcare law goes into full effect in 2014, approximately 16 million additional people will become eligible for Medicaid.  The debate, which cuts to the heart of the social contract between the government and its citizens, has implications for the other large entitlement programs — Social Security and Medicare.  In 2010, the federal government spent $1.5 trillion on those programs, or approximately 43 percent of the federal budget, according to the Congressional Budget Office.  Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) said House Republicans’ upcoming budget proposal would cut Social Security and Medicare, despite the political risk of taking on such popular programs.  Democrats are skeptical.  Changing Medicaid into a block grant means “you have no guarantee that people who are now covered will continue to be covered, or whether (the states) will simply cut back on their Medicaid program,” said Representative Henry Waxman, (D-CA), who is a primary defender of the program.

Nearly 50 Percent of Americans Think the Healthcare Law Has Been Repealed – They’re Wrong!

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

Defying the odds – and facing President Barack Obama’s veto pen – the Republican-controlled House of Representatives voted to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA); a move that was DOA in the Senate.

Despite considerable evidence to the contrary, approximately 50 percent of Americans are convinced that the healthcare law has been successfully repealed.  A poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation found widespread public confusion about the law, with 22 percent of Americans incorrectly believing it has been repealed and another 26 percent unsure or unwilling to say. Even after extensive media coverage of the repeal effort, only 52 percent of Americans accurately responded that the healthcare law remained intact.  According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, “There remains no consensus about whether to keep, expand, replace or repeal the law.  Forty-eight percent are opposed to the law, while 43 percent favor it.  Sixty-one percent of those polled oppose Congress cutting off funding of the law in order to block it, as many Republican lawmakers are considering.”

The Republican-sponsored repeal bill, curiously named the “Repealing the Job-Killing Health Care Law Act,” passed 245 – 189 with assistance from three Democrats.  Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) has refused to bring repeal to the Senate floor for a vote.  President Obama has vowed to veto any repeal effort.  Republicans have not introduced an alternative bill, although Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) said Republicans will ask congressional committees to make “common-sense reforms” to expand coverage and cut costs, but told reporters no “artificial deadlines” were needed.

“As has been true since early in the debate, individual provisions of the new law are more popular than the law itself, complicating the debate over repeal,” the study notes. “So while the public in general is divided over whether to keep or repeal the legislation, if they could pick and choose, the large majority (roughly eight in 10 Americans) would keep the provisions providing tax credits to small businesses, and upward of seven in 10 would keep the provisions that close the Medicare doughnut hole, provide coverage subsidies to those of low and moderate income, institute the new voluntary long-term care insurance program known as the CLASS Act, and prohibit insurance companies from denying coverage based on pre-existing conditions.”

According to a USA TODAY/Gallup Poll, 32 percent of Americans would like to see the law repealed; 13 percent want to see the bill left as it stands. The poll found that 29 percent of Americans want to see minor changes and that 24 percent want major changes.  Representative Ben Chandler, (D-KY), who voted against the law last year, said he voted against repeal because he thinks the law’s “bad” parts should be repealed piece by piece.  “I will not vote to repeal parts of the law that protect central Kentuckians by preventing insurance companies from dropping people if they get sick, ending lifetime caps on coverage and eliminating pre-existing condition exclusions,” Chandler said.

Implementation of the law is continuing as planned, according to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.  “I want the people who are benefiting from the Affordable Care Act — including families, seniors and small business owners — to know that this vote does not change the law and that this department will continue to work every day to implement this vital law.”

Republican Healthcare Repeal Would Cost Taxpayers $230 Billion

Monday, January 17th, 2011

If the Republicans who now control the House of Representatives succeed in repealing the Affordable Care Act – and it’s likely that the Senate will quickly squelch that effort — their action has the potential to increase the federal deficit by $230 billion, according to the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO).  The CBO’s analysis says that repeal of President Barack Obama’s signature legislative victory also will leave 32 million Americans without healthcare coverage.  While some health insurance premiums would be less costly, the CBO analysts estimates that if the law is repealed, consumers will have less coverage and will end up paying more if they lose the subsidies that the new law mandates.

Republicans — who are trying to characterize themselves as the party of fiscal responsibility – quickly dismissed the CBO’s analysis as unrealistic.  Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH), said “CBO is entitled to their opinion.  I do not believe that repealing the job-killing healthcare law will increase the deficit.”

Although the repeal may survive a vote in the Republican-controlled House, It is unlikely to make any headway in the Senate.  Even conservative Democratic Senators like Ben Nelson (D-NE) oppose repeal.  Assistant Majority Leader Dick Durbin (D-IL) said “The majority of the Senate still believes in healthcare reform.  We also believe that the only perfect bill ever enacted was carried down the mountain by Senator Moses.  Every other effort has needed some visitation, reconsideration, and this will too.”

Republican members of the House Rules Committee said a resounding “no” to attempts by Democrats to amend the repeal resolution to protect parts of the law, such as expanding access to mammograms for women and putting new restrictions on insurance companies.  Democrats reacted derisively, noting “You’re saying, ‘Let’s repeal this bill.  We don’t have a replacement.  Trust us,’” said Representative Jim McGovern (D-MA).  “So much for the open process.  There is none.”