Posts Tagged ‘Sustainable Growth Rate’

Time to Resolve the “Doc Fix”

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

Congress’ end of year to-do list inevitably includes the “doc fix” – billions of dollars to avoid deep rate cuts for physicians who treat Medicare’s 48 million patients.  Congressmen and Senators always defer the cuts demanded by a 1997 reimbursement formula — known as the sustainable growth rate (SGR) and which most believe needs to be entirely rewritten.  The deferrals are temporary, and the doc fix has become increasingly difficult to pass through a divided and deficit-wary Congress.  In 2010, Congress put off scheduled cuts five times, with the longest delay lasting one year.

The story is the same heading into 2012.  If lawmakers are unable to agree before returning home for the holidays, 500,000 physicians will face a stiff 27 percent cut beginning January 1.  Although Congressional leaders have vowed to prevent that, they disagree over how to pay for the fix.  There is little doubt some agreement will be reached, but that deal could be delayed until early next year.

The cost of congressional intervention, not surprisingly, has grown: Delaying the cuts — the solution Congress has chosen since 2003 — will cost $21 billion for a one-year delay and $38.6 billion for two years.  Repealing the formula would add approximately $300 billion to the deficit, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

No one imagined that the SGR would cause so much trouble when it was passed as a minor element of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997.  Nearly 15 years ago, Medicare physician spending, which accounts for a small share of the program’s overall outlay, was growing slowly.  The law included other restraints that have since been repealed.  Analysts predicted that, at most, the SGR formula would curb physician payments minimally.  “It wasn’t viewed as a big deal at the time,” said Paul Van de Water, an economist specializing in Medicare with the research group Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.  “They needed a few more billion dollars in savings (for the Balanced Budget Act), so they just tacked on the SGR arrangement.”

Kaiser Health News wonders why Congress doesn’t just scrap the SGR formula.  “Money is the biggest problem.  It would cost about $300 billion to stop the doc fix cuts over the next decade and Congress can’t agree on where to find that kind of cash.  Some lawmakers, including Senator Jon Kyl (R-AZ), have proposed using money saved from winding down the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to finance a permanent fix.  While the idea has found favor among some Democrats, other Republicans oppose it.  For physicians, the prospect of facing big payment cuts is a source of mounting frustration.  Some say the uncertainty led them to quit the program, while others are threatening to do so.  Still, defections have not been significant to date, according to MedPAC.  Physician groups continue to lobby Congress to enact a permanent payment fix.”

Dr. Florence C. Barnett recently decided to quit seeing Medicare patients.  She said the plan covered approximately 33 percent of what it cost her to see patients — and found herself facing a growing Medicare patient population after other local neurosurgeons left the program in 2010.  “This is the way the government will ration healthcare,” Barnett said.  “The people who can afford it will have healthcare, and the people who are only on government support — they will not be able to find a doctor or they will have a very long wait.  It’s happening now.”

A survey conducted by the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission found that among patients looking for a new primary-care physician in 2010, 79 percent experienced no problems finding one.  According to the American Medical Association (AMA), which generally resists limits in reimbursements, nearly 33 percent of primary-care physicians already restrict how many Medicare patients they accept in their practices.

Physicians are once again relying on Congress to put off the impending cut.  It’s a scenario that Glen Stream, M.D. and president of the American Academy of Family Physicians, calls a “Lucy and Charlie Brown and the football thing.”  In other words, physicians have become numb to the whole situation.  This year, that numbness could be risky.  “Doctors are sort of numb from this,” Stream said.  “It’s concerning because I think there’s a very serious chance that this cut could go into place and yet many practicing physicians have heard this years and years in a row and it always seems to get averted at the last minute.  I think that they may not understand the gravity of the situation this time.”

Writing on the MDNews.com website, Maggie Behringer says that “Last year the battle to fund the Medicare deficit — $19 billion for the fiscal year — ended in a one-year measure.  The summer saw a hands-off stance from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services when the administration instructed providers to temporarily cease filing claims until Congress resolved a standstill over stimulus spending and unemployment benefits.  The cut projected for January, 2012, should Congress fail to enact the customary doc-fix, totals to 27.4 percent.  The core conflict for legislators — 19 of whom are physicians, themselves — emerges in the inability of the SGR to adapt in today’s economic environment.  The formula was originally developed to bind spending to the economy’s growth.  Despite initial success, the exponential climb in healthcare costs quickly surpassed the overall market.  The subsequent deficits to fund Medicare were further compounded by the recent depression and ongoing recession.  Even if Congress is able to act in time with a temporary doc-fix over the holidays, the fundamental dilemma will remain a question of funding just as the patient population eligible for Medicare benefits enters a major boom.”

Super Committee’s Failure Raises Questions About Healthcare Funding

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

Now that the Super Committee has failed to identify $1.2 trillion in cuts from the federal budget, automatic cuts totaling billions for everything from Medicare to biomedical research, start in 2013.  Some healthcare sectors will fare better than others.  The primary health entitlement programs, Medicare and Medicaid, are protected under the law that created the Super Committee.  Automatic cuts will not impact Medicaid, the joint federal-state health program for the poor.  Medicare would be cut by two percent – all from payments to hospitals and other providers.

The bad news is that unless Congress reworks the legislation mandating the automatic cuts, a series of across-the-board reductions will begin in 2013.  The House and Senate appropriations committees must decide how to spread the cuts among various programs.  And some of the larger, better-financed lobbies may be able to influence what is cut and what is kept.

Even though the Medicare cuts are limited to hospitals and other medical providers and would not exceed two percent, they argue that is too much and that they sacrificed plenty in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Rich Umbdenstock, president and CEO of the American Hospital Association, said sweeping cuts would hurt Medicare beneficiaries and their families and “also have an impact on the ability of hospitals to provide essential public services to the communities they serve given the impact that Medicare has on the entire healthcare system.”

Officially known as the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, the Super Committee was unable to meet its deadline to come up with $1.2 trillion of deficit reduction required by the law that created it, much less the $4 trillion that deficit hawks said was necessary to stabilize the finances of the U.S. government, whose debt has topped $15 trillion.  The failure ensures that the fiscal debate between Democrats who want to protect social programs and increase revenue by raising taxes on the wealthy; and Republicans who want smaller government and have pledged to reject tax increases will be a fundamental choice confronting voters in 2012.

“After months of hard work and intense deliberations, we have come to the conclusion today that it will not be possible to make any bipartisan agreement available to the public before the committee’s deadline,” Representative Jeb Hensarling,(R-TX), and Senator Patty Murray, (D-WA) said.  The co-chairs thanked committee members, staffers and “the American people for sharing thoughts and ideas and for providing support and good will as we worked to accomplish this difficult task.”

Writing for Politico, David Nather speculates on whether the Super Committee’s failure has harmed efforts to reform Medicare and Medicaid.  It would be easy to conclude that the Super Committee’s failure means the big, expensive health care entitlement programs — Medicare and Medicaid — are untouchable.  It also would be wrong.  The timing was off, coming too close to a presidential election.  The co-chairs weren’t powerful enough.  The work came too soon after a summer debt deal that Democrats hated.  Republicans couldn’t give the kind of concessions on taxes that Democrats needed.  And the alternative to a Super Committee deal on healthcare entitlements — the two percent automatic cuts in healthcare payments and defense funding that will now take place in 2013 — wasn’t harsh enough to force a deal on Medicare and Medicaid. In fact, it might even have been the easier way out.  All of which means Medicare and Medicaid are not off the table forever.”

The Hill’s Sam Baker offers a different perspective. “The Super Committee’s demise is a mixed bag for the American Medical Association and other groups that wanted the 12-member panel to tackle Medicare’s payment formula, known as the sustainable growth rate (SGR).  The AMA — with bipartisan support in Congress — pushed hard for the supercommittee to include in its deficit-cutting package a long-term fix to the SGR.  The formula calls for automatic annual cuts in doctors’ payments, which add up as Congress consistently delays each cut from taking effect.  Aspirations of a long-term SGR patch should be put to rest, healthcare lobbyists said. But they questioned whether the supercommittee push was ever realistic, because an SGR fix would add to the deficit.”

“I never once believed that the Joint Select Committee would be the one to do that,” said Julius Hobson, a senior adviser at the Washington, D.C.-based law firm Polsinelli Shughart and a former AMA official.

Medicare Proposes Cutting Medicare Physician Reimbursement in 2012

Wednesday, July 20th, 2011

Medicare physician reimbursements may be slashed by as much as 30 percent.  The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has proposed changes that will update payment policies and rates for physicians, dialysis facilities and for services to Medicare beneficiaries in hospital outpatient departments, and cut Medicare payments to home health agencies.  CMS’ proposed rule for Medicare payments to physicians and non-physician practitioners includes a 29.5 percent payment rate cut next year.  “This payment cut would have serious consequences and we cannot and will not allow it to happen,” said CMS Administrator Donald M. Berwick in a statement. “We need a permanent (Sustainable Growth Rate) fix to solve this problem once and for all.  That’s why the president’s budget and his fiscal framework call for averting these cuts and why we are determined to pass and implement a permanent and sustainable fix.”  Additionally, CMS proposed a 3.35 percent cut in Medicare payments to home health agencies; a 1.8 percent increase in payment rates for dialysis treatments; a 1.5 percent increase in hospital outpatient rates; and a 0.9 percent increase in ambulatory-surgery center payments.

CMS’ proposed 2012 Physician Fee Schedule includes updated payment policies for physicians and nonphysician practitioners.  CMS estimates total payments under the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule for 2012 will be $80 billion.  In updating the Physician Fee Schedule, CMS must comply with the Sustainable Growth Rate formula, which is estimated to reduce Medicare payments to physicians by 29.5 percent.  In previous physician fee schedules, payment cuts through the SGR have been cancelled through legislation.  Additionally, CMS plans to recover $10 million next year by reducing payments for chiropractic codes by approximately two percent as part of the budget neutrality requirement of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003.

Another component of the proposed rule would create a process for certain physician-owned hospitals to apply for an exception to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) ban on capacity expansions at such facilities.  The proposed rule also would amend the Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program to let eligible hospitals and critical-access hospitals report clinical quality measures in 2012 through an electronic reporting pilot.

Additionally, CMS has issued a proposed rule that would update payment policies and rates for services furnished to Medicare beneficiaries in hospital outpatient departments and ambulatory surgical centers starting next calendar year.  The rule helps emphasize the importance of beneficiaries being able to receive quality care without regard to the care setting.  “The CMS is committed to using every tool at its disposal to create incentives that will improve the quality and safety of care received by Medicare beneficiaries, wherever that care is provided,” Berwick said.

The rules include proposals that would strengthen the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing program,  as required by the ACA and whose purpose is to improve the safety and quality of patient care and make healthcare more affordable.  The program — established through a CMS final rule — ties a portion of a hospital’s payment for inpatient stays under the Inpatient Prospective Payment System,  a method of reimbursement in which Medicare payment is made based on a predetermined, fixed amount.